What Type of Degrees are Undergraduates Pursuing?

In 2006 and ’07, degrees in the field of business made up 21% of the bachelor’s degrees awarded. Over 327,500 bachelors degrees were awarded in business that year.

In 2006 and ’07, of the 1.5 million bachelor’s degrees awarded that year, over 50% were concentrated in five fields: business (21%); social sciences and history (11%); education (7 %); health professions and related clinical sciences (7%); and psychology (6%). During the same time period, the fields of visual and performing arts (6%), engineering and engineering technologies (5%), communication and communications technologies(5 percent), and biological and biomedical sciences (5%) represented about an additional 20% of all bachelor’s degrees awarded.

Why an undergraduate degree?

  • Increased competition
  • Increased earnings. How much is costing you without a degree?
  • Improved performance in the workplace
  • Professional advancement & recognition
  • Personal satisfaction & enrichment
  • Spiritual Growth and leadership
  • Increased earnings. How much is it costing you without a degree?

In 2007, young adults ages 25-34 with a bachelor’s degree earned 29% more than young adults whose highest educational attainment was an associate’s degree and 55% more than young adults whose highest educational attainment was a high school diploma or its equivalent.

In 2007, the median earnings of young adults with a bachelor’s degree were $45,000, while the median earnings were $35,000 for those with an associate’s degree, $29,000 for those with a high school diploma or its equivalent, and $23,000 for those who did not earn a high school diploma or equivalent degree. In other words, in 2007, young adults with a bachelor’s degree earned 29% more than young adults with an associate’s degree, 55% more than young adult high school complete, and 96% more than those who did not earn a high school diploma.

Why a Graduate degree?

  • Increased competition
  • Increased earnings
  • Improved performance in the workplace
  • Professional advancement & recognition
  • Personal satisfaction & enrichment
  • Spiritual Growth and leadership

In 2007, the median earnings of young adults with a master’s degree or higher were $56,000, or 24% more than young adults with a bachelor’s degree. (Multiplied by the length of a 30 year career, it’s a substantial increase in earnings.)